Pink ribbon porn

Ash Moore, Resident Blogger (’14, University of Oklahoma College of Law)

I was wandering through the internet the other day when the story about pornhub.com donating money to Susan G. Komen for every “breast related video” watched during Breast Cancer Awareness month. Now, never-you-mind where, exactly, I was wandering.

Porn is divisive. Everyone has strong opinions about it. But it’s also a multi-billion-dollar-a-year industry, whether anyone reading this likes that fact or not. That’s why I was a little surprised to see Komen snub their nose at free money. I know Komen is at least a relatively conservative organization and we all remember the Planned Parenthood disaster of 2012. That’s why the pornhub.com snub surprised me even more. Komen’s fundraising is still down after the Planned Parenthood fiasco. The previously un-blemished organization is still trying to figure out how to fix its reputation. Personally, I don’t think turning down donations is the right way to go.

Before anyone jumps up and starts throwing reputation back in my face, I’d like to say that I wouldn’t care if Komen told pornhub.com to simply take their name off the website and still offered to take the check. I understand you don’t want Pervy Herv watching his 300th hentai video of the day to think Komen and pornhub.com are partners. But Komen demanded pornhub.com to take their name off the website AND refused to take a check. In a half funny, half depressing twist, pornhub.com reached out to every other breast cancer group to give away their money. Supporters of pornhub.com can say they were the bigger men and we all know they’re all dying to say that.

Susan G. Komen is more than a group of people giving money to breast cancer research. It’s an incredibly powerful symbol of womanhood, perseverance, beating the odds, unity, and hope. I understand not wanting to be associated with a porn site. But they need to understand they have an obligation to every person who has put their hope in Komen’s hands. Every person who drives around with a pink ribbon on their car needs Komen to put the energy they’re spending on branding and refusing donations into finding a cure.

Everyone knows someone whose life has been affected by breast cancer. And everyone knows someone who watches porn. If Komen could raise the kind of money the porn industry has, there would already be a cure. Let’s stop fighting each other and stop denying the realities of the world we live in. Instead, let’s work together to make it better for everyone. All Komen has to do to help that happen is take a check. Is that really asking too much?